New grants to department faculty

The past year has been another successful year for Carolina Mathematics faculty obtaining grants to support the activities of the department. In addition to the many awards that continue from previous periods, new grants over the past 12 months include the following awards:

Congratulations to everyone involved.

Faculty deliver invited lectures at conferences and summer schools

Summer for Carolina Mathematics includes a variety of courses taught in our summer sessions, many faculty busy working on their sponsored research, and an enhanced opportunity to travel to workshops and conferences to give lectures and meet with fellow mathematicians for collaborative activities.

Ivan Cherednik gave an invited lecture last month in the representation theory seminar at the Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu-Paris Rive Gauche. He is giving a similar lecture as one of four invited speakers on June 24th at the Institute Henri Poincaré.

Hans Christianson will speak later this month at the conference on “Quantum chaos, resonances and semi-classical measures” in Roscoff, France.

Jingfang Huang was a plenary speaker last week at The 1st Chongqing Workshop on Computational and Applied Mathematics.

Chris Jones gave one of the plenary lectures at the First Central Region Conference on Numerical Analysis and Dynamical Systems, held last month at the University of Kansas. He then gave a public lecture colloquium on ”Climate Change: the Science and the Math” at the University of Missouri and an invited lecture at a conference on “Topological Methods in Differential Equations and Nonautonomous Flows” in Florence, Italy. This week, he is one of the keynote speakers at the “Workshop on slow-fast dynamics: theory, numerics, application to life and earth sciences” in Barcelona.

Robert Lipshitz spoke last month at the “Low Dimensional Topology” workshop at the Simons Center for Geometry and Physics.

Jeremy Marzuola is presently giving a topics course at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology on Nonlinear Waves this summer, with 8 lectures spread over 7 weeks on nonlinear bound states and their stability properties in the context of the Schrodinger equation. He will then speak later this month at the conference on “Quantum chaos, resonances and semi-classical measures” in Roscoff, France.

Laura Miller was an invited session plenary speaker at the symposium on “Microscale Interactions in Aquatic Environments” held at Les Houches Physics School in March. In recognition of her excellent interdisciplinary teaching, Miller has also been tapped to teach the mathematics “bridge” course this summer to the first cohort of incoming Chancellor’s Science Scholars.

Peter Mucha gave five lectures as one of the four keynote speakers at the Summer School on Network Science held last month at the Interdisciplinary Mathematics Institute at the University of South Carolina.

Karl Petersen gave an invited seminar talk last month at Ohio State. This week, he is attending the Automata Theory and Symbolic Dynamics Workshop at the University of British Columbia, where graduate student Kathleen Carroll will be talking about their joint work on symbolic dynamics (as part of her master’s project).

Lev Rozansky was an invited speaker at the conference on “Quantum Topology and Hyperbolic Geometry” held in Nha Trang, Vietnam last month.

Michael Taylor was an invited speaker at the “Analysis, Complex Geometry, and Mathematical Physics” conference at Columbia University last month.

Alexander Varchenko is one of the plenary speakers next week at the 21st International Conference on Integrable Systems and Quantum Symmetries in Prague. Later this month, he is also an invited speaker at the “Experimental and Theoretical Methods in Algebra, Geometry and Topology” conference in Romania.

Jon Wahl gave a mini-course series of 4 invited lectures at the conference “Geometry and Topology of Complex Singularities” in April 15-19, at CIRM, Luminy, near Marseille.

The above only covers the first half of this summer. We will come back to this topic again next month to discuss the faculty presentations scheduled for the second half of the summer. In the meantime, best wishes for pleasant travels to all involved.

Cima recognized by College of Arts and Sciences

The career of Prof. Joe Cima was celebrated at the Spring Recognition Reception held by the College of Arts and Sciences last month, in advance of his upcoming retirement, including remarks about Joe from our colleague Prof. Michael Taylor (pictured in the center, with Joe, left and Joe’s wife Evelyn, right).

Joe Cima graduated from Indiana State in 1955 and was inducted into the army before entering graduate school at Penn State, where he earned his Ph.D. in 1963. He spent a year at Stanford as an NSF postdoc before joining Carolina in 1964. During his nearly 50 years of service at Carolina he has also held visiting positions at various institutions and interesting places, including Arizona, Indiana, Michigan, Marseilles, Dublin and Finland. He was awarded a Fulbright Fellowship in 1991 and was the Gaines Chair at University of Richmond in 2004.

Joe has been a very active mathematical analyst, with over 100 publications and two books, both published by the American Mathematical Society (AMS): The Backward Shift on Hardy Spaces and The Cauchy Transform. He has organized five conferences and had two other conferences held in his honor: one in Dublin and one during an annual AMS meeting. He has supervised the Ph.D. dissertations of eight students at Carolina.

As emphasized in the remarks made by Michael Taylor, “Joe arrived at UNC at a time when the Math Department was transitioning to Group One level in research, and he has long been a voice for quality in our department.” Congratulations and thank yous to Joe for an amazing career and for all he has done for Carolina Mathematics.

The same reception also recognized the many Carolina Mathematics faculty who were named inaugural Fellows of the American Mathematical Society in 2012. Continued congratulations to all for these well earned recognitions.

American Mathematical Society Fellows

The inaugural class of Fellows of the American Mathematical Society (AMS) were announced yesterday, November 1, 2012. The inaugural class of 1119 Fellows represents over 600 institutions, with excellent representation from Carolina Mathematics. Current faculty members named to this honor include

Additionally, two emeritus professors were named to this inaugural class of fellows:

The AMS press release describes the Fellows program:

The Fellows of the AMS designation recognizes members who have made outstanding contributions to the creation, exposition, advancement, communication, and utilization of mathematics. Among the goals of the program are to create an enlarged class of mathematicians recognized by their peers as distinguished for their contributions to the profession and to honor excellence. Regarding the new Fellows of the AMS program and the Society, AMS President Eric M. Friedlander says, “The AMS is the world’s largest and most influential society dedicated to mathematical research, scholarship, and education. Recent advances in mathematics include solutions to age-old problems and key applications useful for society. The new AMS Fellows Program recognizes some of the most accomplished mathematicians — AMS members who have contributed to our understanding of deep and important mathematical questions, to applications throughout the scientific world, and to educational excellence.”

Being named as an AMS Fellow is a phenomenal recognition and career achievement for each of these faculty. Congratulations to each and every one of them.

2011-12 Recap: New research grants awarded to Mathematics faculty

Following up on the good news in last week’s post about the NSF MRI award to the Fluids Lab, we are overdue to celebrate the variety of new federal research grants awarded to faculty in the Department of Mathematics over the past year.

This list represents only new awards led out of the Department in the one-year period ending June 30, 2012. Importantly, as many such awards are for multiple years, it does not include the many continuing research grants in the Department that were initially awarded in previous years. The list also likely misses some interdisciplinary activities in the Department that are in collaboration with faculty in other departments where the proposal was sent through the other department. Even without these caveats, it is an impressive list for the year.

Where available, hyperlinks to more information about the specific award are provided.

National Science Foundation:

Air Force Office of Scientific Research:

  • Greg Forest & Peter Mucha, Multiscale Mathematics of Nano-Particle-Endowed Active Membranes and Films

Army Research Office:

  • Jim Damon, Comparing Mathematical Models and Experimental Data for Intake Capacity Distributions for Plant Root Structures

National Institute of General Medical Sciences:

Office of Naval Research:

  • Roberto Camassa & Rich McLaughlin, A Desalinization Facility for Stratified Fluid Dynamics Research at the UNC Joint Fluids Laboratory
  • Chris Jones, Data Assimilation and Control in Oceanography

Congratulations to all involved!

PDE conference in honor of Michael Taylor

We have had a busy week in the Department with a week-long conference on Partial Differential Equations: Analytic and Geometric Aspects, in honor of Michael Taylor’s 65 Birthday, including a number of distinguished visiting speakers.

Michael Taylor is a William R. Kenan Distinguished Professor in the Department of Mathematics. Among his numerous accolades, he is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. While the breadth and depth of his mathematical research inspired the presented talks and posters, numerous speakers and attendees additionally shared their reminiscences about Michael over the years and the ways that he impacted their lives. With 29 talks and a collection of posters, it was a busy week of celebration. Congratulations to Michael!

A special thank you to Profs. Jeremy Marzuola and Hans Christianson, along with Department alumna Prof. Anna Mazzucato (Ph.D. 2000) of Penn State, for their efforts obtaining National Science Foundation funding for and organizing this conference. Additional support was provided by the Departments of Mathematics at UNC and at Penn State. Thank you to Hans and Prof. Jane Hawkins for photos.